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 The Constitution of the Kingdom of England

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Marie-Thérèse

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PostSubject: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:53 am

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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:57 am

B1.C1.

Quote :
Chapter I : The Royal Council

This Chapter is part of Book I of the constitution of England, the Government.

    Article I: Definition

      1. The Royal Council is a council composed of the Great Officers of State and is presided by the Sovereign of England.


    Article II: Members

      1. As mentioned in Chapter 1; Article 1, the members of the Council are the Great Officers of State.

      2. The Sovereign of England is the only person who can name or discharge an Officer of State.

      3. There are 9 Great Officers of State in total:

        3.1. Lord High Steward
        The Lord High Steward is the first of the Great Officers of State. He’s the regent of the Kingdom and presides the Royal Council when the Sovereign is absent. He also leads the trials of Peers.

        3.2. Lord High Chancellor
        The Lord High Chancellor is the second of the Great Officers of State. He’s the head of the Diplomacy (=Chancery) of the Kingdom, and the second regent. He also is the Keeper of the Great Seals, the seals of the Sovereign. He can appoint a custodian of the Great Seals to pass on this function.

        3.3. Lord High Treasurer
        The Lord High Treasurer is the third of the Great officers of State, and therefore the third Regent of the Kingdom. He is in charge of the finances of the Kingdom, as well as the Royal Treasury.

        3.4. Lord High President
        The Lord High President is the fourth of the Great Officers of State, and therefore the fourth Regent of the Kingdom. He presides the House of Lords, in the Sovereign’s name.

        3.5. Lord Privy Seal
        The Lord Privy Seal is the fifth of the Great Officers of State and therefore the fifth Regent of the Kingdom. He presides the House of Commons in the Sovereign’s name.

        3.6. Lord Great Chamberlain
        The Lord Great Chamberlain is the sixth of the Great Officers of State and therefore the sixth Regent of the Kingdom. He’s in charge of the Royal Palace, the Palace of Whitehall.

        3.7. Lord High Constable
        The Lord High Constable is the seventh of the Great Officers of State and therefore the seventh Regent of the Kingdom. He’s in charge of the armies of the Kingdom of England (not the Navy).

        3.8. Earl Marshall
        The Earl Marshal is the eight of the Great Officers of State and therefore the eight Regent of the Kingdom. He’s in charge of the Sovereign’s horses and stables.

        3.9. Lord High Admiral
        The Lord High Admiral is ninth of the Great Officers of State and therefore the ninth Regent of the Kingdom. He’s the Commander of the Royal Navy.


    Article III : Function

      1. The general function of the Royal Council, next to the specific tasks of the Great Officers, is to make laws and decrees, and to assist the Sovereign.

        1.1. Only the Sovereign can approve and by consequence validate laws.


    Article IV: Decisions

      1. Decisions of the Royal Council are made by votes, although the Sovereign has the right to ignore the outcome of the vote. All the Great Officers of State are able to vote.

      2. All decisions made by the Royal Council shall be announced by the Sovereign or Lord High Steward.

      3. Every decision made by the Royal Council can be recalled by the Sovereign.


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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:58 am

B1.C2.

Quote :
Chapter II : The Royal Heraldry

This Chapter is part of Book I of the constitution of England, the Government.

    Article I : Definition

      1. The Royal Heraldry in its most general sense is the institution that encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms, the practice of designing, displaying, describing, and recording coats of arms and the conserving of genealogical records.


    Article II : Organisation

      1. The Royal Heraldry is composed of the Officers of Arms:

        1.1. The King of Arms
        The King of Arms is the highest in ranking in the Royal Heraldry and therefore the leader of this Institution, and can only be discharged and appointed by the Sovereign. He has to make sure that the heraldic rules are respected, as well as the rules of Peerage. He has the right to open a case against a common at the Royal Court if the rules aren’t respected, but he can’t trial a Peer, as this right belongs only to the Lord High Steward or the Sovereign.

        1.2. The Herald of Arms
        The Herald of Arms is a normal member of the Royal Heraldry and can only be appointed and discharged by the King of Arms or the Sovereign. It is his duty to participate in Royal ceremonies, he’s the judge in tournaments, he governs the patterns of nobility, the register of Peers, their coat of arms and families, as well as it is his task to make the coats of arms and seals. It’s also his duty to make sure that the heraldic rules and rules of Peerage are respected and to rapport any offence.

        1.3. The Pursuivant of Arms
        The Pursuivant of Arms is an apprentice. He can only be appointed or discharged by the King of Arms or the Sovereign. He can only make blazons and seals.


      2. In case of absence of the King of Arms the Sovereign will appoint a First Herald to replace him until he returns.


    Article III : Heraldic trial

      1. In case of an offence against the rules of Heraldry or the Peerage, the concerning person will get an official warning from the Royal Heraldry. In case of a second offence, a case will be opened at the Royal Court.

        1.1. This procedure can be ignored by the Sovereign in case of a major offence.


      2. An heraldic trial against a Common shall be lead by the King of Arms and judged by the Sovereign.

      3. An heraldic trial against a Peer shall be lead by the Lord High Steward (Book I, Chapter I, Article II, point 3.1.) and judged by the Sovereign.


    Article IV : The coat of arms

      1. A coat of arms can only by carried by a Peer, a Dignitary with ornaments, a Clerk or other persons or groups with a special agreement of the Sovereign.

      2. A dignitary or a clerk that isn't member of the Peerage can only carry a personal blazon or a family blazon, or combine those two.

      3. A Peer has to carry the Coat of Arms of his title, is there isn't any blazon for his title yet, then he has the right to choose one that isn't correspondent with another already existing blazon. They have the possibility to combine it with a family blazon or a personal Coat of Arms if they already had one before.

      4. A Peer’s blazon has to have a crown on it. If a Peer has more than one title, he has to carry the crown of the highest title.

      5. The right to carry a mantel behind the blazon goes to dignitaries, more specific to following people:
      - Members of the Royal Council
      - Members of the Royal Heraldry
      - Members of the Royal Chancery
      - High Judges & High Prosecutor
      - Ladies-in-waiting of the Queen

      6. Only High Peers (Earl, Marquess, Duke, Prince) can add supporters to their blazon, but none of those supporters can have a crown, for this is a privilege of Monarchs, as well as supporters carrying a flag.

      7. Only a family Coat of Arms that is registered by the Royal Heraldry can be used.


    Article V : The noble family

      1. A family can only be named noble if it’s registered by the Royal Heraldry.

      2. Any family can ask to become a noble family if they have a living noble member.

      3. Wills are kept secretly by a Herald or the King of Arms.



* We remind to the fact that only the Sovereign can appoint a noble.
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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:03 am

B2.C1.

Quote :
Chapter I : Earldoms, Marches and Dukedoms in the Peerage of England

This Chapter is part of Book II of the constitution of England, the Peerage.

    Article I : Dukedoms in the Peerage of England

      1. Dukedom of Cornwall (Royal Dukedom)
      Held by the heir of the throne. If there’s not an heir held by the Monarch.

      2. Dukedom of Lancaster (Royal Dukedom)
      Personal property of the Monarch.

      3. Dukedom of York (Royal Dukedom)
      Held by the second heir for the throne. If there’s not a second heir held by the Monarch.

      4. Dukedom of Gloucester

      5. Dukedom of Norfolk

      6. Dukedom of Bedford

      7. Dukedom of Somerset

      8. Dukedom of Buckingham

      9. Dukedom of Richmond

      10. Dukedom of Cumberland

      11. Dukedom of Albemarle


    Article II : Marches in the Peerage of England

      1. March of Winchester

      2. March of Hertford

      3. March of Worcester

      4. March of Salisbury


    Article III : Earldoms in the Peerage of England

      1. Earldom of Huntingdon

      2. Earldom of Dorset

      3. Earldom of Northampton

      4. Earldom of Shrewsbury

      5. Earldom of Surrey

      6. Earldom of Devonshire

      7. Earldom of Leicester

      8. Earldom of Arundel

      9. Earldom of Bedford

      10. Earldom of Pembroke

      11. Earldom of Lincoln

      12. Earldom of Oxford

      13. Earldom of Carlisle

      14. Earldom of Suffolk

      15. Earldom of Northumberland

      16. Earldom of Westmorland

      17. Earldom of Bath

      18. Earldom of Rutland

      19. Earl of Sussex

      20. Earldom of Southampton

      21. Earldom of Bridgewater

      22. Earldom of Exeter

      23. Earldom of Devonshire

      24. Earldom of Berkshire

      25. Earldom of Holderness

      26. Earldom of Denbigh

      27. Earldom of Bristol

      28. Earldom of Middlesex

      29. Earldom of Anglesey

      30. Earldom of Bolingbroke

      31. Earldom of Cleveland

      32. Earldom of Manchester

      33. Earldom of Monmouth

      34. Earldom of Norwich

      35. Earldom of Lindsey

      36. Earldom of Marlborough

      37. Earldom of Sunderland

      38. Earldom of Stanford

      39. Earldom of Dover

      40. Earldom of Winchilsea

      41. Earldom of Nottingham

      42. Earldom of Caernarvon

      43. Earldom of Newport

      44. Earldom of Chesterfield

      45. Earldom of Kingston-upon-Hull

      46. Earldom of Portland

      47. Earldom of Strafford

      48. Earldom of Chichester

      49. Earldom of Brentford

      50. Earldom of Lichfield

      51. Earldom of Scarsdale
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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:30 am

B1.C7.

Quote :
Chapter VII : The Royal Court

This Chapter is part of Book I of the constitution of England, the Government.

    Chapter I : Composition

      1. The Royal Court is composed by the highest judge of the Kingdom, the Sovereign, two High Judges, the High Prosecutor, and the jury, High Peers and High Clergy.


    Chapter II : Function

      1. The Royal Court is used for Heraldic Trials, trials for High Treason against the Crown and trials of Peers.

        1.1. Trials of Peers are lead* by Lord High Steward.

        1.2. Heraldic Trials are lead* by the King of Arms.

        1.3. Trials for High Treason against the Crown are lead* by the High Prosecutor.


      * This means that the trials are opened (the Sovereign can open a trial too) by the concerning persons, and that hey are the ones that present the evidences.


    Chapter III : Procedure

      1. After the opening of the case, the leader of the trial presents the evidences to the Jury and Judges.

      2. After this, the suspect has the chance to defend himself once.

      3. After the defence of the suspect, the leader of the trial can make his plea.

      4. There after the Jury and the Judges shall vote. In each trial there are only two options: guilty or not guilty.

        4.5. Each Judge, member of the Jury and the Sovereign have one vote, although this last one can give his grace to the suspect. When the vote remains unsolved, the Sovereign has one more vote to make the difference.


    Chapter IV : Punishment

      1. If guilty, the Sovereign determines the punishment. This can go from paying a fine to the Kingdom untill dead penalty.

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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:35 am

B1.C3.

Quote :
Chapter III : The Royal Chancery

This Chapter is part of Book I of the constitution of England, the Government.

    Article I : Definition

      1. The Royal Chancery is an institution that contains the Diplomacy of the Kingdom of England.


    Article II : Members

      1. Lord High Chancellor
      The Lord High Chancellor is the leader of the Royal Chancery. He’s the only one, next to the Sovereign and the Vice Chancellor, who can appoint the other members of the Chancery.

      2. Vice Chancellor
      The Vice Chancellor is the second leader of the Royal Chancery. He replaces the Lord High Chancellor when he is absent. All his decisions are reversible by his superiors.

      3. Ambassadors
      Ambassadors are representatives of the Kingdom and the Sovereign of England in a foreign region. Their working area is fixed.

      4. Legates
      Legates are representatives of the Kingdom and the Sovereign of England in foreign regions. Unlike Ambassadors they don’t have a fixed working area, but they represent the Kingdom when and where it is necessary.

      5. Secretaries
      The Secretaries take care of the administrative matter of the Chancellery. It’s also their task to welcome the foreign Ambassadors.


    Article III : Function

      1. The Royal Chancery guarantees the relations with other countries, in times of peace as well as in times of war.

      2. It is via this institution that treaties are realized, although nor the Lord High Chancellor nor any other member of the Royal Chancery can propose or accept a treaty without having the agreement of the Sovereign.


    Article IV : Privileges

      1. Ambassadors and Legates can be considered as the 'voice and eyes of the Sovereign' in another country, therefore they must be treated with respect, for they are also Dignitaries of the Kingdom. This also means that he always have to think before he speaks, to not damage the reputation of England or the relationships with the region that is assigned to him.

      2. Ambassadors and Legates can only be brought to Justice by the Sovereign himself.


    Article V : Duties

      1. Ambassadors and Legates have the duty to inform the Lord High Chancellor or the Sovereign regular about anything things that happen in their environment.

      2. In case of strugglings between the Kingdom of England and the lands in which he's representing his Sovereign, he has to remain calm and not make any hasty decisions that could further damage the relationships.
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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:34 am

B2.C2.

Quote :
Chapter II : Titles

This Chapter is part of Book II of the constitution of England, the Peerage.

    Article I : Royal Peerage

      1. The Royal Peerage contains following titles:

        1.1. King & Queen
        The King and Queen are the highest nobles of the English peerage. They are the Sovereigns, the highest instance of the Kingdom, and the only ones who can grant titles.

          1.1.1. This title is inheritable.


        1.2. Princes & Princesses
        Princes and Princesses are members of the Royal Family they have the second rank in English peerage.


    Article II : High Peerage

      1. The High Peerage contains following titles:

        1.1. Dukes & Duchesses
        Dukes and Duchesses are the highest rank in the Peerage. This title always contains a Duchy, granted by the Sovereign to govern in his name.

        1.2. Marquises & Marchionesses
        Marquises and Marchionesses have the fourth rank in the Peerage. This title always contains a March, granted by the Sovereign to govern in his name.

        1.3. Earls & Countesses
        Earls and Countesses have the fifth rank in the Peerage. This title always contains a Earldom, granted by the Sovereign in his name.


      2. All the titles of the High Peerage are inheritable.


    Article III : Low Peerage

      1. The Low Peerage contains the following titles:

        1.1. Viscounts & Viscountesses
        The title of Viscount or Viscountess is the sixth rank in the Peerage. Unlike to the titles in the High Peerage, this title doesn’t contain lands to govern.

        1.2. Baron & Baroness
        The title of Baron or Baroness is the seventh rank in the Peerage. As well as with the title of Viscount or Viscountess, this title doesn’t contain land.


      2. All the titles of the Low Peerage are inheritable.


    Article IV : Not-inheritable titles

      1. The title of Knight, that is given by the Sovereign or a Chivalrous Order, is not inheritable, although it’s a noble title.

      2. Sons and Daughters of Peers, even if they who do not yet have a title, are called ‘Lady’ and ‘Lord’ or ‘Sir’. They aren’t really members of the Peerage, although they are still considered as people with noble blood.


    Article V : Granting titles

      1. Only the King or Queen can ennoble people.
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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:36 am

B2.C4.

Quote :
Chapter IV : Genealogy

This Chapter is part of Book II of the constitution of England, the Peerage.

Article I : Preamble

    1. This Chapter handles about families, marriage, heritage etc. The rules of those things in the Peerage are quiet different from those of the Commons, and have to be strictly followed.


Article II : Marriage

    1. A noble marriage (between two nobles or a noble or a common), has to be approved by the Sovereign.

    2. A noble marriage can only be annulled with agreement of the Sovereign.

    3. In case of a divorce, the titles return to the one who had that title before the marriage.

    4. A child of divorced parents is seen as a bastard and an illegitimate.


Article III : Heritage

    1. Only a brother, sister or child can inherit a title.

    2. In case of the dead of a noble :

      2.1. If the Peer has legitimate children but did not make a will, the titles will pass on to the legitimate oldest son.

      2.2. If the Peer has legitimate children and made a will, the titles will pass on as he desired in his will.

      2.2.1. The concerning Peer cannot leave his titles to brothers or sister, due to the fact that he has children.

      2.3. If the Peer has no legitimate children and no will, the title will forfeit and go back to the Sovereign.

      2.4. If the Peer has no legitimate children but a will, the title will go to the one that he desired if this is a brother of sister of the concerning Peer.

      2.5. If he has a bastard-child that he has recognized, he can leave this to this child if he mentioned that in his will.


Article IV : Adoption

    1. A noble can adopt a child as their own child, if the Sovereign gives his permission and makes an official announcement. The Royal Heraldry has to make a pattern as well, concerning the recognition of the adopted child.

    2. This adopted child has the same rights as a normal child, although he cannot inherit a title if the concerning nobles have normal children, except when it is mentioned in the will.


Article V : Family Coat of Arms

    1. A noble family has the right to have a Coat of Arms. All members of the family that have the right to carry a blazon can merge it with their Coat of Arms. But be aware of the fact that this Coat of Arms has to be registered, together with the family tree, at the Royal Heraldry.

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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Fri Jan 23, 2009 1:37 pm

B1.C4.

The Royal Army is described in the Charter of the Royal Army.
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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Sun Jan 25, 2009 10:38 am

B1.C10.

Quote :
Chapter X : The Royal Guard

This Chapter is part of Book I of the constitution of England, the Government.

    Article I : Definition

      1. The Royal Guard is the personal guard of the Monarch. They have to insure the protection of His and Her Majesty and the Royal Family.


    Article II : Ranks

      1. Captain of the Royal Guard
      The Captain of the Royal Guard has the highest rank in the Royal Guard, after the Monarch. He has the right to appoint, promote or discharge guards.

      2. Mounted Sergeant of the Royal Guard
      A Mounted Sergeant of the Royal Guard has the second highest rank of the Royal Guard. He is in charge of one division of Mounted Guards. One division has 10 mounted guards in it.

      3. Sergeant of the Royal Guard
      A Sergeant of the Royal Guard has the second highest rank of the Royal Guard. He is in charge of one division of Royal Guards. One division has 10 royal guards in it.

      4. Mounted Royal Guard

      The Mounted Royal Guard is a normal guard, under the authority of the Mounted Sergeant of his division and the Captain.

      5. Royal Guard

      The Royal Guard is a normal guard, under the authority of the Sergeant of his division and the Captain.


    Article III : Justice

      1. The Monarch has complete authority over the Royal Guard, therefore the Sovereign only can determine a punishment for one of the members of the Royal Guard for one of following crimes:
        - Abuse of power
        - Desertion
        - Treason
        - High Treason


    Article IV : Members

      1. All members of the Royal Guard have to be baptized by the Saint-George’s Church.

      2. All members need to have an empty criminal record.
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PostSubject: Re: The Constitution of the Kingdom of England   Tue Jun 02, 2009 2:46 pm

Quote :
Chapter II : The Regency

This Chapter is part of Book I of the constitution of England, the Government.

    Article I: Definition

      1. The Regent is whoever appointed High Lord or Lady of the Kingdom and governs in the name of the monarch. The Regency is required to supply the monarch in case he or she becames uncapable of governing or until it reaches the age of sixteen.


    Article II: Title

      1. The title of Regent designs a function and isn’t equal to the condition of a peer of the Kingdom. If the person who bears the title of Regent also holds other honours or titles, the title of Regent must be announced in preference to the rest of them. The complete title is Lord or Lady Regent of England, Scotland and Ireland, the treatment given will be “Your High Grace”.


    Article III: Designation

      1. Any person can be appointed Regent as long as he or she is a follower of the Saint George Church. The only one capable of appointing a Regent is the Monarch himself or in any case the last will of a deceasing Monarch. The Monarch will appoint a Regent after hearing the opinion of his High Council and will oficialize this appointment with a sealed document.


    Article IV: Length of the function

      1. The Regent will hold this function as long as he or she keeps the trust of the Monarch and the conditions stated in the Article III. Whenever he or she loses the trust of the monarch or the condition of follower of the Saint George Church he or she will be stripped from the functions of Regency and all it’s privileges.


    Article V: Functions

      1. The functions of the Regent are:

        1.1 to appoint and dismiss members of the High Council

        1.2 to pass new laws for the British Kingdoms England, Schotland and Ireland

        1.3 to declare war and peace

        1.4 to approve new charters

        1.5 to appoint and dismiss any civil servants

        1.6 to act as a represent of the Queen

        1.7 to take care of the Church of Saint George

    Article VI: Representation

      1. All the above mentioned functions are to be excercised by the Regent in the name of the Monarch. The Regent will be able to perform them in the same fashion of the Monarch but stating at the end of every document “By (Regent’s name and titles) hand and in the name of (Monarch’s name)”. The Regent will be able to use the monarch’s seal apart from his own in order to seal the documents.


    Article VII: Limitations

      1.It’s forbidden for the Regent to undertake any action that may fit in the following:

        1.1 appointing the Throne’s heir

        1.2 presiding the ceremonies of the Church of Saint George

        1.3 disposing of the Crown’s lands

        1.4 appoint new companions to the most noble Order of the Garter



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